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Sad Girl, 2006 acrylic on canvas, 160 x 130 cm acrylic on canvas, 160 x 160 cm acrylic on canvas, 160 x 160 cm acrylic on canvas, 160 x 160 cm acrylic on canvas and aluminium frame box, 541 x 130 x 25 cm (triptych) acrylic and felt pen on canvas, 160 x 160 cm acrylic on canvas, 200 x 160 cm acrylic on canvas, 140 x 200 cm acrylic on canvas, 120 x 100 cm acrylic and felt pen on canvas, 50 x 50 cm graphite and acrylic on paper, 50 x 50 cm graphite and acrylic on paper, 50 x 50 cm graphite and acrylic on paper, 50 x 50 cm graphite and acrylic on paper, 50 x 50 cm graphite and acrylic on paper, 50 x 50 cm
Sad Girl, 2006
graphite and acrylic on paper, 50 x 50 cm

“….If we take the perspective of this scene as our departure point in looking at the new series of paintings Can I change my career for a little fun?, we are instantly struck by a major change in the paradigm that has taken over the past 20 years. In this case, it can be reduced to the following: while it was possible earlier for an advertisement depicting a boy pushing a carrot into the mouth of a little girl to appear without any fear of censorship, this was not the case with a cartoon in which an eye torn out of a small beaver left a slimy trail or an explosion ripped out the intestines of a sweet little squirrel.
Nowadays everything has been turned topsy-turvy. The present day sees itself as far less “naïve”. We think that we know much more about ourselves and about children. We are conscious that innocent motifs hide terrible sexual perversions and that the presentation of explicit violence always and only a “show” that, so people think, has no link with reality. As we have pointed out, the paintings of Kaludjerovic asks no questions in this regard. What they do primarily is to confront us with the change in the paradigm and with the as yet unexplained relationship between “pretend“ violence and real violence.
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Not one of our views of the universal commercial exploitation of children can remain the same after we have seen the works of Kaludjerovic. On the other hand, these paintings are not the result of any didactic intention on the part of the artist. On the contrary, they are themselves deeply enmeshed in a world governed by our inability to play a direct part in it and hence to change it. It is precisely the closeness of these paintings that disturb us."

excerpt from the text "We might come from Hell but we're too young to tell..." by Branislav Dimitrijevic